In this episode, host Nathan Shield talks about the people within your company with the CEO of Pure Physical Therapy and Founder of Next Level Physical Therapy, Frank Garza, PT. Frank started seeing growth in his PT clinic once he started weeding out the "bad apples" in his organization and focused on hiring and firing those people who weren't in alignment. How did he do it? He, along with his wife, established the purpose and values of the company and hired and fired accordingly. Now, the people on his team are rowing in the same direction and growth has accelerated. Plus, the energy in his clinic is fresh and exciting, and the culture is drastically changed. Want to establish a culture like Frank? Set the standards, establish purpose and values, and get your team on the same page. Your growth and an exciting culture will immediately follow!

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Identifying The Bad Apples In Your Organization With Frank Garza, PT

I have Frank Garza out of Texas, a successful physical therapy owner who recognized that once he had established his purpose and values, he was able to weed out those employees that weren't on the team and we're limiting him. By removing those people, he has been able to achieve significant growth. Based on the book, Tribal Leadership, Frank recognized that there were certain stages of people and certain stages of a team that contribute to your success. As you weed out those people that are in stages one and two, and as you move your team into stages four and five, that's when you make significant growth. That's when you make significant progress and start to achieve the purpose that you set out to achieve. This is great that we can have a personal experience establishing the purpose and vision, hiring accordingly, getting the right people on the team, and then seeing the success that comes from it.

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I've got Frank Garza, a physical therapist out of McAllen, Texas. He is the CEO of Pure Physical Therapy and Pilates and also a Founder of Next Level Physical Therapy mastermind and consulting group. I've interviewed a number of original founders and members of Next Level Physical Therapy. Frank is on to talk about an important topic. Thanks for being with us, Frank. I appreciate it.

Thank you for having me, Nathan. I appreciate it as an NLPT being able to come aboard and talk about all the stuff that us private practice owners wish we knew when we were starting.

Tell us a little bit about you. Where did you start? Tell us about your physical therapy path and especially your ownership and entrepreneurship path and what's led to where you are.

I graduated and I played sports. I think like most physical therapists, they get into it because they got hurt and got exposed to the field and connected with their physical therapy team at the time. That's how I got intrigued about it. I ended up graduating and I coached and taught for a little bit. I liked that, but I knew that I wanted to be my own boss. I knew that I wanted to do something that I could control and that I could lead. In football, that's the position that I held. I liked it and embraced it. Going into physical therapy, I knew that I could have my own business. That's why I got into it too. I went through it and got out. I worked for a private practice clinic for a year. Right after that, I felt I knew enough to go out on my own and do things on my own and get my feet wet. I say sometimes that I rushed it and I say that might have been a mistake, but at the same time it probably could have been the best thing I did because people were there trying to help.

There was a time when there was a lot of work. Private home health companies were picking up PT companies to do their home health visits on the side and paying them a good rate. That's how we got started. We said, “This is an opportunity to go on our own and do something that we can fill our schedules and get other people to work under us.” We did that model for two to three years and then it went south bad. Luckily, we had already planned to do our outpatient clinic and that's how our outpatient clinic got started.

You started doing home health first before you went into it.

We started doing home health first. The reason for that was the people that we were working for said, "There's enough work out there. We'll help you get started.” You build your company name, you get a contract, you start bidding home health agencies for work. There was so much work that you could fill your schedule fairly quickly. It's also something easy to manage. You didn't have all the red tape about credentialing and audits and all that stuff with paperwork because they controlled everything. You were just a contract payer. It was a good way to get that taste of freedom, flexibility and ownership of your own business. At the same time, it was one of those models that you were chasing the profits all the time. You weren't making that much money and you were seeing a lot of patients, you had people that were underneath you seeing a lot of patients and you have to pay them. If they didn't pay you on time, then you couldn't pay them on time. We started learning that it wasn't a great model to grow, to scale and to make the money that we wanted to make. We started saying, "Our ultimate dream was to have an outpatient clinic." We had enough capital to invest in that.

It’s a good thing we did because the home health went south shortly after that. There were a lot of people getting busted for fraud. That model went to hell. We've entered into outpatient and we did what we did and we got started with what we knew. The experience of running the home health, but it was a totally different monster. There were so much things that we had to do before we even saw our first client, our billing and all this other stuff. It was an adventure, to say the least. We knew right away that we needed to hire people to help us. We hired staff. We chugged along for a year, two and three. Have you ever been on a roller coaster ride and sometimes the whole cart shakes on one of the stable tracks? That's how the first three years felt like.

You almost have to fail at everything HR before you understand it. Click To Tweet

Not everybody was a good fit for your team, I'm sure.

That's exactly what I was going to get to. We started realizing quickly that who we hired was like, "It's not going to work out. Who are we going to hire? We don't have anybody to hire." I think our mentality at the time was, “We need people to work for us. Let's pick up whoever is available.”

“If they're breathing and can follow some instructions, then bring them on.”

If it was somebody that somebody referred, that helped. That's even better. There were people that we knew in the home health field and they were like, "I have a cousin, a friend that was looking for a job." We quickly assemble the staff. We also quickly found out that we were in for some trouble if we didn't fix it because it wasn't the ideal staff. We didn't know what the ideal staff was. We learned a lot.

In my situation, I was like, "I don't necessarily have any job descriptions written out, but I'm going to put you in this position. I expect you to do what you're supposed to do." I was so naive to think that I could put him in a position and expect immediate productivity, an immediate buy-in. I found out later on that it was probably good to hire people who have bought into your vision, who share the same values. They're aligned. Maybe it's even better if I actually develop a job description and tell them what productivity looks like and how I'm going to measure them. It all comes over time, but you wish you would learn that sooner rather than later because things change when you start hiring based on that model.

I learned a ton. I learned that if we had concentrated on that department itself early on, on the human resource department for sure, that maybe we have not struggled as much as we did because it was a struggle. I look at my position and I'm learning that it's still a continuous work in progress. There's never HR and building your culture and your team like that. That doesn't stop because it's always evolving, things happen within your team and you’ve got to replace them. There are some things you can't control, but it's a work in progress. I also learned that you almost have to fail at everything HR before you understand it. We're not taught any of this in school. We don't know where to grab all these concepts, stuff and resources early on. It sometimes takes you telling the story of failure to another friend and they're like, "You had to do this and you’ve got to read this. You should go take this class." You learn a lot from failure, but who doesn't? One of the other things that I learned is that you cannot swipe someone else's HR material and expect for you to understand it and then much less for your staff to understand it. It doesn’t happen.

You think that there's a one-size-fits-all HR employee handbook. That's not true. Much of your culture and so much of you is simply how you do things. That's what I consider culture to be. This is the way we do things around blankety-blank physical therapy. That eventually develops your culture and it goes even back to your HR material. This is how we treat patients. This is how we expect you to show up to work. This is how we handle disciplinary actions. All that stuff needs to be broken down and individualized for your own clinic.

The number one thing that I learned early on is that we did not have that company culture that we wanted for the first three years and we have to fix it quick. It started with us, which is exactly what you were saying. We have to make a transformation mentally of what we wanted to instill in our company, what the vision was, what the mission was, how were we going to do it and make sure that everybody understood that, everybody was clear on that message. That was the number one thing that I think if people are out there wondering, "How do I do that? How do I avoid making the same mistakes?" Travis already did a show about this. It starts with us and our vision and our mission. It’s making sure that our staff clearly understands that and making sure that everything they do is working towards that common team goal that you're trying to accomplish. It's something that we realize we didn't have early and we started to change it quick.

It's probably you and your wife that came up with the vision and the mission. Maybe you created values between yourselves and your team. When you finally implemented that after three years, was that rough to implement it and get everybody's buy-in? Did you end up getting rid of a lot of people after establishing and planting the flag like “This is who we are?” Was it an easy transition for you or was that something that got smoothly brought into your company?

PTO 70 | Identifying Bad Apples
Tribal Leadership Revised Edition: Leveraging Natural Groups to Build a Thriving Organization

The transition is never easy when you're trying to get rid of bad culture and create a totally new culture. For us, we identified that we had people already in our organization that we're not going to work out based on the meeting that we had about our mission and vision, all that stuff about what kind of individuals we wanted, what kind of characteristics they needed to have per each individual position? That's key too because you want them in the right position. All of that starts with us. We need to identify the vision and mission and how you are going to do it? It’s on your core values. If you know that you're hiring for the front desk, you're going to go look for certain characteristics for that front desk. That's your expectation. You got to give them an expectation for every position. I looked back and I said, "What did I do in some of my coaching career with my team to get buy-in and culture? What did other coaches do with me when I was playing?” There was one coach that brought out a binder like it’s the beginning of the football season and everything that we were going to live by that season was in that binder.

Our hyped-up a chant before the game is spelled out, everything is written. That was his way of instilling that culture. It was a new coach coming in. He was changing everything. Even before school started, we were reading stuff through that binder and getting to know what his philosophy was, how we were going to do things, and how he expected us to do things. If we didn't abide by-in or if we're doing something different, then there was a consequence to it. The same thing applies to your business. You got to set that standard as a CEO and as a leader. You make sure that they follow it.

That's the important thing to note. A lot of times when you set the mission, vision and values in midstream that you've been practicing for a few years, you decide, "Let's establish a foundation and get down to some fundamentals and talk about vision, mission, and values." Inevitably there are going to be some people who don't like the implementation of that structure and that don't have buy-in. You're more than likely going to lose some people. You have to understand that up front and you've got to be okay with that because the people that you lose are the people that haven't bought into your clinic. Once you shed yourself from those people and you can attest to this, Frank, you will then experience some accelerated growth. Especially as you start replacing those people with people who actually do buy-in to your mission, vision and values. As long as you're establishing that over and over again, you don't stop talking about the mission, vision and values after the initial introduction. Once you plug it in and then start hiring according to those, then you start getting some people who buy-in and the growth then accelerates.

It’s happened to us on two different occasions. One of the things to educate our audience on is how do I identify the bad ones and the good ones? What are some characteristics of some bad culture in your company? I was brought onto this book called Tribal Leadership. It goes through five different cultural stages. After reading that, I started evaluating my staff and listening and observing their body language. You'll find out right away who's on board and who's not. I'll go through those cultural stages to help people identify them for those that are wondering what are they and how do I identify them. Stage one is characteristics and qualities. This is the type of mindset that creates street gangs. We don't want any of this in our company. Their thing is that life sucks. They're despairingly hostile, they band together to get ahead in a violent world. The great example is The Shawshank Redemption. We don't want to hire stage ones, but sometimes you'll get people in your meetings that have that bad body language and in everything you say they’re like, "No, yeah, whatever." There's always something negative to everything you say. There's always a problem to every solution.

Stage two is a little bit different. Instead of, “Life sucks,” they're a little bit more personal, “My life sucks.” They're a little bit more passively antagonistic. They may not say something verbally, but in a meeting, they'll go cross their hands in judgment and not be totally bought in but not be totally against you either. They never get interested enough to spark any passion. These are the ones that sometimes you come in from a mastermind or conference, you've got all these ideas to share with the group and they're like, "I’m not interested." They're not too excited. By the same token, if you say a funny joke to them, the laughter is a sarcastic resigned thing. They’re the whatever type. The talk is that they've seen it all before and watched it all fail.

A person at this stage two will often try to protect his or her people from the intrusion of management. The mood here is that their life sucks. It’s a cluster of apathetic victims is how they characterize that. Stage one and twos are exactly what you don't want to have. If you're looking and coming into meetings and you're seeing these types of behaviors, you want to know that they're not the ones that you want and then they start changing a little bit. They start getting a little bit more positive. Stage three, the theme is, "I am great and you're not.” Knowledge is power so people hoard it. They're the people at this stage they have to win and winning is personal. They're your big competitor people. They will outwork and outthink their competition on an individual basis. The results from this as a collection of lone warriors. These are your hardworking individuals, but not so much team players. They're often seeking help and support, continually disappointed that others don't have their ambition or skills.

If somebody is not trying as hard as they are, they’ll be disappointed. Their complaint is that they do not have enough time or competent support. They’re like, “I’ve got to do this by myself.” It's a bunch of self-described star players. You can't have too many star players. They can't play together as a team. That's basically the theme there. You’ve got your stage four and five. These are the ones that you want all the time. Instead of going from, "I'm great," the stage four theme is "We're great." This is where I think most of your positive company culture is, your great, thriving, growing companies. When they have great culture, they have a great team. They have a lot of stage four characteristics and qualities because it's all about team. Everyone is excited about seeing each other at work. They take the tribe away from the person's sense of self. These are the people that if they take the team away, they feel like, "Where am I?" They feel lost because they feel the team is their second family. At this stage, the culture is effortless. Nobody's trying too hard. Everybody's doing what they’ve got to do and working for each other as opposed to for themselves.

The only one that has influence is the tribal leader. Here in stage four, whoever's at the very top is the only one that actually has influence over this culture because other than that, there are no lone warriors. Everybody's working together as a team. You have your last one, which is, "Life is great." The language revolves around infinite potential and how the group is going to make history. They want to make a global impact. This is where they make an example of Apple where they say that the innovators from Apple and Steve Jobs were at stage five because they did things that made a global impact and they wanted to make life great. The mood is an innocent wonderment. A very small percentage of companies have this type of characteristic. Most have stage four, but you definitely don't want the ones and twos. That's important to understand, to identify what you have.

That's great because you can put this assessment up against each individual within your team very easily. I think it's easy by what you laid out to say, "Who are my stage one players? Who are my stage two players? Who are my stage threes?" What have you learned? Can any of these people change from two to three or three to four? Do you simply hire slowly or fire fast? Do you simply get rid of them?

The transition is never easy when you're trying to get rid of bad culture and create a totally new culture. Click To Tweet

The ones and twos, there's no change there. The threes can get into fours and that's definitely what you want.

Just cut your losses.

Especially if you have a big organization and you have this person in a position where they have a lot of people under them. If they're a stage one and two, imagine what they're telling all those people under them. Imagine the mindset and the stuff that they're feeding them. That's what those people think of everybody else on top. That's not necessarily true.

When you have those people in your company, they can be a real poison. It's almost like if they're allowed to linger long enough, everyone that they touch in their immediate circle becomes poisonous as well. We've had that experience before in one of our clinics where one person in particular was poisoned and unfortunately, they were the leader. After that person left, it took at least a year before we got everybody out who they had an influence on before that clinic started turning around. Looking back on it, my partner and I both believe that we should have closed down the clinic, fired everybody that had a connection to that poisonous leader and started from scratch and got some new people. It can be that devastating and that pervasive when that one person has that much influence.

I'll tell you a personal story of my own too. Sometimes you think it was so bad and then you’ve got a new staff and it got better. You're meeting some goals that you'd never met before and you're like, "This is great." It plateaued for me. I was like, "What's going on?" We've got a new hire. This new hire, it was the first time we have put them through a rigorous hiring process and had this funnel built out and had all these triggers that they had to do before they even came into an interview. I was like, "This guy has got it." We hired him and sure enough, he came in and in six months outworked everybody in the front desk so much that we redid all our internal processes at the front desk. That's when I knew, I was like, "We may have another problem." That wasn't his job. He was going to come in and do reception. He ended up coming in with all these things and changes and made things better. The problem was those other two people that were there before him didn't I go through that interview process that you went through. We didn't weed out as much as we thought early on.

Since then, we've hired another one and we ended up tweaking his process more to make it more specific and refined to make sure that we got another person just like him. The other two people are not there anymore and the other two that we hired are now all cross-trained the way he did everything at the front desk. When we brought them on board, we made the onboarding process and the interview process very detailed to everything that he had created and changed up there with my direction. Even when you think you've got it, you probably have to do another thing. That's what happened to me. We went through and we hit some numbers that we had never hit the first time around. We plateaued and we weren't hitting our goals that had after that. He came on and totally changed it. We brought these two other girls on.

As soon as the new staff came on board without the old staff here, because there was a little bit of overlap, they have put in their two weeks. There were several part-timers in training. The very first week when all the old staff was gone and it was just a new staff with the person that we trained up there, we hit our 200 visits a week goal that we haven't hit in a while. It always happens for the better, but I feel it only happens for the better if you put in that work, your blood, your sweat and your tears into making it better. We refined our process, we identified the leaks, we identify leaks again. We tweaked and refined the process and we got a better product out of it. You got to keep tweaking and refine. That's the main thing.

That's the perfect example of the theorem that the people that got you here are not the same people that will get you there. Some people will be good at getting you to a certain point. What's cool about this also is it exemplifies how you were so intentional about the person that you want to hire. In your own words, it was a rigorous process. For someone at the front desk, if you can breathe and say hello, usually that's good enough for us to sit at the front desk, but you took it a step further. What do we exactly want out of this person? How are they going to be the most productive and how are they going to be the face of my clinic? Immediately, as soon as you did that and got rid of the other people, your numbers grew again. That’s a great example. 

Our main focus was we want to create overwhelm for these candidates. That's what I told the guy, Bruce, he helps some of my marketing and all my funnels and stuff. I said, "I want to create overwhelm." He goes, "What do you mean by that?" I said, "I want you to give them everything and all descriptions and tasks that they will be having to handle." Even if they only have to do it once, even if it's not their main task. I said, "I want them to feel overwhelmed." I was like, "Why?" It's because if somebody can come in knowing that they're a little overwhelmed and stick the interview, then they're going to be good because there's a lot of overwhelm at the front desk. Wouldn't you agree? He’s like, “Yes.” That’s what our mentality was when we did that.

PTO 70 | Identifying Bad Apples
Identifying Bad Apples: When you have employees that have great culture, then you have a great team.

Congratulations that you experienced that because that front desk is such an important part. Correct me if I'm wrong, are you paying these newer guys a little bit more than you were previously? 

They're still in the probationary period. It’s equal to what it was for the others but going forward, they're both doing verifications. I already prepped them and have their one-month meeting and say, "This is where I want to be able to get you at, but I want to make sure that you're completely independent with all of these things." They're not quite there yet, but they're helping so much more than the other two were as far as what they're going above and beyond doing.

That's awesome because you're incentivizing them and you're telling them, "If you're going to make more, this is how you're going to do it." That's always awesome that you can incentivize them. There was also a change in the quality of the candidate once we decided to increase our per hour rate that we were willing to pay that front desk person. If we were stuck in the $8 to $10 an hour range, we’ve got $8 to $10 an hour type of people. Once we bumped that up to closer to $12 or $15, then we got $12 to $15 an hour people. I'm not saying that you need to share your numbers, but I'm leaving that as an example that sometimes you should be paying a little bit more for someone who is super productive at the front desk because that person drives so much of the success of your clinic.

I had a conversation with my wife about this. We were going to try to increase base pay across the board for techs and front office going forward, but with these expectations, our next tech coming in is not going to start there. He's going, "You're going to start here and you could get to here once you get to a year-and-a-half experience and you're doing this." Our techs had been with us for about a year and a half, two years. They’re in a little bit more responsibility. One of them is responsible for the cleanliness of all the gym and the other one is responsible for all the equipment. We have to order stuff. He knows my online account where we go order. He just gets it approved. They're a big part of what we do here and they're making more, but if somebody that comes in and starts to do tech work, they’re not going to start there. They're going to have the expectation of, "If you can do this like Alex is doing at some point, this is where you could be.” I do bonus them. Everybody got a bonus. We do a little a profit share at the end of the quarter. Even though their base rate is a little lower, when they get incentivized and bonus, it turns out to good hourly grade. I do feel you on that trying to get those candidates.

We're talking about front desk and tax, but this is correlated with physical therapists and PTAs as well, even the clinic directors. They can have such an influence on your team if they're in stage one and stage twos. You want to have more of the stage fours, people that are bought into the culture. We're talking about your hiring process. Are there other things that you do to cultivate that culture and move those people into stage four types of employees where they're bought into the team and it's all about effortless culture or the things you do to maintain that?

I've been working on that a lot. That's something that we've been changing around here because before, we were tied up with life. We're trying to get their business to where it needed to be. Get the kids in the home life to where it needed to be. It wasn't at the top of my focus at the time, nor did I know it needed to be. I started seeing all the positive effects of that. I read a line by Peter Drucker somewhere in his book, he said, "Culture eats strategy for breakfast. It never stops. It's a 24/7 thing." I said that to my wife and I said, "I'm going to take on this hat and know that I'm going to be coming up with some ideas to hang out as a team. We're going to be celebrating any and all little wins, things that nobody else is looking at." We’re trying to create our identity. That's what I told her. As a team, we’ve been hanging out a lot.

Every quarter, we set some goals and when we hit them, we celebrate them. When we celebrate, we go out. I rented a house on the beach and everybody came out and I barbecued all day. They went to the beach and we're in the pool and hung out and had a place to stay and drink. We’re hanging out with each other. We try to create an atmosphere of family and trust just like you do at home. It's hard because it’s like, “They're not your real kids, Frank.” I was like, "I know they're not my real kids, but if we take care of them, it's going to turn around two folds, ten folds for you as a company.” It takes a lot of work.

You're talking about regarding culture, we've talked it about a number of times on the show. When your team members treat their work team as if they were family, that's next-level stuff. You get so excited when they'd not only bought into the company culture, they've bought into each other and they wanted to see each other succeed. They're trying to help and they're trying to promote each other and help each other out. That's the stuff that you hope for as a business owner. In order to cultivate that, it takes celebrating wins, creating goals together. I think quarterly meetings are a huge success. You can push a lot of great cultural values and unity in those cultural events if you're intentional about it and if you plan those out properly. It can gain a lot of traction. It's nice to not only implement the mission, vision and values, but then follow that up with intentional culture-building activities that show the mission, vision and values. We talk about it during those times. That's when you start seeing a culture change.

We try to do that, even when we get together casually, we'll play little games, “Who can recite all our core values the fastest?” We throw stuff out there and always relate stuff to the clinic, even joke about some things that happened in the clinic and create that atmosphere. At the end of the day, we're CEOs and that means we have to lead. We want to lead them to do great things. I used to be a coach too. We can lead them to be good, but when they overachieve and we lead them to overachieve, that makes us feel great. They want to make you feel great. They want you to be proud of them. They don't want you to pat them on the shoulder and say, "Great job." In some cases, you may not know this or they may not tell everybody, but they may have a hard life at home and work is their happy place. It says a lot about how you do that. You can lead by a lot of ways. You can lead by service. You can lead by love. I like to motivate my team. Every Monday, we do a Monday update and we do a little motivational Monday video clip. I'm big into motivating.

Knowledge is power so people hoard it. Click To Tweet

The other thing I've learned that I think helps them respect you and learn a little bit about you as a boss is to not be afraid to feel embarrassed in front of them for something you did. Being in a business where I own it with my wife, I have some experiences sometimes since we work together and we live together. Sometimes you're at work and I may say something that maybe I don't realize that other people are in front and it's rude. When I realize that, I immediately will stop, apologize and make it public like, "I messed up." The faces and the looks that I get from them sometimes it's cool because they're like, "He's normal." They're not afraid of me because they know I'm just human as they are and we all make mistakes. The example is man up about your mistake and make it right or make sure that you expect them to do the same when they messed up. You're going to move on. It's okay.

Show a little bit of humility. Show them that it's okay, that we can make mistakes and we can overcome them and next time I'm going to do better. 

At the end of the day, I tell my kids, “As long as you give it 110%, that's all that matters. Give it your all.”

Is there anything else you want to share, Frank?

This is one thing that I read and I thought I want to share with my staff. I read this and I'm going to share it with them at the next meeting. It says, "If your presence doesn't make an impact, your absence won't make a difference." That goes for all of us. As a CEO, you want to make an impact on your business. You have to come in here full of positive energy, leading your team, motivating your team, loving your team, setting the mission, the vision. Make sure everybody's clear on it so that everybody can focus and go forward. As an employee, you need to do your job and make an impact in your post. When you're not there, it's not going to make a difference.

How do you want to make an impact?

When you're not there, they're going to be like, "Where's Frank?” because you made an impact.

As a leader, you want to be able to say, “I made this impact.” As a leader, especially in a physical therapy clinic, personally I didn't want my impact to be that I saw 60 patients that week. That's not the impact you want as a leader. The impact that you want as leaders is, “I've affected these people's lives whether it's patients and or employees. This is how I lead and this is how I've created a culture that inspires people.” That provides much more power than it does simply treating patients all day.

It's who you are, what are you there to do and how you're going to do it?

PTO 70 | Identifying Bad Apples
Identifying Bad Apples: If your presence doesn't make an impact, your absence won't make a difference.

Frank, thanks for taking the time. I appreciate you sharing your wisdom. If people wanted to reach out to you and ask you questions, what's your contact information? 

I'm going to give you two ways that you can opt in for any information. It's a text message. You can text MM to 844-444-1481. If people want to get onto our app and get some of the free stuff that we have on there for mastermind stuff, they can text app APP to the same number.

That's for the Next Level PT mastermind and coaching that you are doing?

Yes, correct.

It's always awesome talking about culture. I get excited about what we can do to filter out people who aren't bought in and find those people who are bought in because the sailing is so much smoother when you got those people in the right seats in the bus. 

We're still tweaking and refining because that's the process we have for the front desk, but we still got to create one for the clinic and for PT and everything else. It's a work in progress.

Thanks for your time, Frank. I appreciate it. 

No problem, Nathan. Thank you.

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About Dr. Frank Garza

PTO 70 | Identifying Bad ApplesDr. Frank Garza has been a physical therapist since 2006. After working as an employee for one year in private practice, he decided to venture into an independent private practice setting, with his wife, where he is now the CEO.

In doing so they began to see patients in their own home for about 2 to 3 years before expanding into their current outpatient physical therapy facility, Pure PT & Pilates (PPTP), which he owns and operates along with his wife, Dr. Amy Garza.

Together, they have been managing and running the practice for seven years, soon to be eight. Frank is also a founder of Next Level Physical Therapy (NLPT), a consulting group that helps other physical therapy CEOs create the time, choice and financial freedom they deserve.

In the last 2-3 years, he has been really focused on developing and refining his practice’s Human Resources Department. Frank is currently a resident of Mcallen, Texas, a small city located in South Texas, with his twins, Frankie and Tessa, as well as his beautiful wife Amy!

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